Microsoft Word - EQU - Infusion Pump flowcharts and PM lists (Liz).doc

EQUIPMENT  Infusion  Pump  Troubleshooting     Diagnostic  flowchart  (Syringe  Pumps)  Syringe  pumps  use  a  syringe  driven  by  a  lead  screw  to  deliver  precise  amounts  of  liquid  medication  intravenously.    


 




   #   Text  box   Explanation  or  Comment  1   Begin:  IV  infusion  pump  (syringe)   Start  the  diagnostic  process.  2   Device  turns  on?   Displays,  lights,  and  sounds  indicate  the  machine  has  turned  on.  3   Troubleshoot  power  supply  (separate  flowchart).   Syringe  pumps  generally  have  an  AC-­‐DC  power  supply.  4   Replace  battery  if  necessary.   Old  batteries  are  a  common  problem  with  syringe  pump  batteries.  5   Device  runs  on  battery  only  (no  AC)?   Check  if  the  machine  will  run  on  battery  when  power  is  unplugged.  This  is  a  safety  feature  on  many  syringe  pumps.  6   Pump  creates  correct  flow  rate?   Measure  the  flow  rate  using  a  container  of  known-­‐volume  to  collect  the  fluid  and  a  stopwatch.  For  small  flow  rates,  it  may  be  necessary  to  use  a  precision  scale  to  measure  the  fluid  output.  Flow  rate  is  volume  divided  by  time.  7   Is  flow  rate  zero?   Check  if  the  machine  will  generate  any  output  of  fluid.  8   Is  flow  rate  too  high?   Compare  the  measured  flow  rate  to  the  amount  programmed  in  the  machine.  9   Confirm  clutch  is  not  slipping.   Low  flow  can  be  caused  by  a  clutch  slipping  on  the  lead  screw.  Repair  if  necessary.  10   Clean  and  lubricate  lead  screw  as  necessary.   See  BTA  skills  on  cleaning  and  lubrication.  11   Confirm  syringe  is  loaded  properly.   Incorrect  flow  rate  can  be  caused  by  improperly  loaded  syringe.  12   Confirm  cables  to  and  from  sensors  and  motor  are  seated  properly.   See  BTA  skills  on  electric  connections  and  connectors.  13   Replace/calibrate  sensors  as  necessary:  syringe  position  sensor,  and  syringe  size  sensor  (if  applicable).  
Faulty  sensors  can  cause  faults  in  controlling  the  flow  rate.  


14   Is  flow  rate  correct?   Measure  the  flow  rate  using  a  container  of  known-­‐volume  to  collect  the  fluid  and  a  stopwatch.  For  small  flow  rates,  it  may  be  necessary  to  use  a  precision  scale  to  measure  the  fluid  output.  15   There  may  be  a  fault  with  microprocessor.   Possible  problem  with  the  microprocessor  or  computing  software.  




16   Consider  replacing/disposing.   If  the  problem  lies  with  the  microprocessor,  the  machine  may  need  to  be  disposed  and  replaced.  17   Confirm  syringe  is  loaded  properly.   Incorrect  flow  rate  can  be  caused  by  improperly  loaded  syringe.  18   Confirm  proper  menu  settings  and  options  are  in  use.   User  error  may  be  a  problem  if  machine  is  reported  for  lack  of  flow.  19   Clean  and  lubricate  lead  screw  as  necessary.   See  BTA  skills  on  cleaning  and  lubrication.  20   Is  flow  rate  zero?   Check  if  the  machine  will  generate  any  output  of  fluid.  21   Repair  or  replace  stepper  motor.   If  corrective  measures  don't  start  fluid  output,  there  may  be  a  problem  with  the  motor  that  drives  the  syringe.  22   Flow  ceases  when  syringe  pump  is  off?   Verify  that  the  flow  ends  when  the  pump  is  turned  off  or  the  control  panel  is  used  to  end  the  flow.  23   Confirm  syringe  is  loaded  properly.   An  incorrectly  loaded  syringe  could  leak  fluid  when  flow  is  turned  off  by  controls.  24   Correct  leaks  in  tubing.   See  BTA  skills  on  plumbing  leaks.  25   Confirm  syringe  plunger  will  not  move  freely  without  motor.   If  plunger  moves  independently  of  machine  controls,  check  mechanical  connections.  26   Does  high  pressure  alarm  sound  when  tube  is  pinched  after  syringe?   If  the  output  tube  is  occluded,  the  machine  should  emit  a  high  pressure  alarm.  27   Is  machine  always  silent?   Investigate  if  machine  makes  noises  due  to  any  other  inputs  or  alarms.  28   Replace/calibrate  force  sensor  on  syringe  plunger.   High  pressure  alarm  is  not  sounding.  Check  the  force  sensor  that  measures  the  force  applied  to  the  syringe  plunger.  29   Ensure  force  sensor  cables  are  properly  connected  and  seated.   See  BTA  skills  on  electric  connections  and  connectors.  30   Replace  speaker.   Machine  is  not  in  silent  mode,  but  it  does  not  make  noise.  Replace  the  speaker.  31   Go  to  begin.   Restart  the  diagnostic  process  to  see  if  the  corrective  measures  have  repaired  the  machine.  32   Go  to  begin.   Restart  the  diagnostic  process  to  see  if  the  corrective  measures  have  repaired  the  machine.  33   IV  pump  is  working  properly.   Return  the  machine  to  service  via  the  appropriate  clinical  personnel.  34   Verify  machine  not  in  silent  mode.   Silent  mode  may  be  preventing  the  alarm.  Turn  off  silent  mode  and  check  alarm  again.  




 Diagnostic  flowchart  (Feeding  Pumps)  Feeding  pumps  are  a  type  of  infusion  pump  that  delivers  higher  volumes  of  nutritional  fluid  enterally.  This  chart  includes  enteral  pumps  working  with  two  basic  mechanisms:  a  peristaltic  pump  using  actuated  “fingers”  to  pump  fluid  through  a  flexible  tube  and  a  cassette  pump,  in  which  the  pumping  is  achieved  by  a  cassette  as  part  of  a  circuit  that  detaches  from  the  machine.  


   




#   Text  box   Explanation  or  Comment  1   Begin:  feeding  pump  (enteral)   Start  the  diagnostic  process  for  a  work  order  on  a  feeding  pump.  2   Device  turns  on?   Lights,  displays,  and  sounds  are  signs  the  device  is  powered  on.  3   Troubleshoot  power  supply  (separate  flowchart).   Feeding  pumps  generally  have  an  AC-­‐DC  power  supply.  4   Replace  battery  if  necessary.   Old  batteries  are  a  common  problem  with  feeding  pumps.  Test  battery's  ability  to  receive  and  hold  a  charge.  5   Device  runs  on  battery  only  (no  AC)?   Check  if  the  machine  will  run  on  battery  when  power  is  unplugged.  This  is  a  safety  feature  on  many  feeding  pumps.  6   Pump  creates  correct  flow  rate?   Measure  the  flow  rate  using  a  container  of  known-­‐volume  to  collect  the  fluid  and  a  stopwatch.  Flow  rate  is  volume  divided  by  time.  7   Is  flow  rate  zero?   Check  if  the  machine  will  generate  any  output  of  fluid.  8   Is  flow  rate  too  high?   Compare  the  measured  flow  rate  to  the  amount  programmed  in  the  machine.  9   Check  for  leaks  in  tubing.   Tubing  leaks  can  cause  low  flow  rate.  See  BTA  skills  on  plumbing  leaks.  10   Change  cassette  (if  applicable).   Some  feeding  pumps  use  a  cassette  or  pump  set  as  an  accessory  that  must  be  changed  and  refilled  periodically.  Sometimes  the  cassette  must  be  “primed”  or  “reset”  after  refilling.  Use  the  menu  options  on  the  machine  to  reset  the  cassette.  11   Adjust  rollers  to  ensure  proper  distance  from  tube  (for  peristaltic  pump).   For  peristaltic  feeding  pumps,  incorrect  flow  rates  can  result  from  rollers  that  are  either  too  far  or  too  close  to  the  tube.  12   Replace/calibrate  any  flow  sensors.   Incorrect  flow  rates  can  be  caused  by  faulty  or  disconnected  flow  sensors.  See  BTA  skill  on  electrical  connections  and  connecters.  13   Change  cassette  (if  applicable).   Some  feeding  pumps  use  a  cassette  or  pump  set  as  an  accessory  that  must  be  changed  and  refilled  periodically.  Sometimes  the  cassette  must  be  “primed”  or  “reset”  after  refilling.  Use  the  menu  options  on  the  machine  to  reset  the  cassette  14   Verify  free  flow  valve  closes  when  door  is  open.   Some  feeding  pumps,  especially  peristaltic  feeding  pumps,  have  a  free-­‐flow  valve  that  closes  to  prevent  flow  when  the  machine  case  is  open.  Ensure  the  valve  is  working  properly  and  clean  it  or  adjust  it  mechanically  if  necessary.  




15   Replace/calibrate  any  flow  sensors.   Incorrect  flow  rates  can  be  caused  by  faulty  or  disconnected  flow  sensors.  See  BTA  skill  on  electrical  connections  and  connecters.  16   Verify  cassette  is  properly  attached  (if  applicable).   An  improperly  loaded  cassette  or  pump  set  can  prevent  any  fluid  output.  17   Verify  free-­‐flow  valve  is  open.   The  free-­‐flow  valve  must  be  open  to  allow  fluid  output.  Insure  the  valve  is  working  properly  and  clean  it  or  adjust  it  mechanically  if  necessary.  18   Check  for  any  leaks  inside  machine.   A  leak  in  the  tubing  can  cause  a  spill  and  prevent  flow.  See  BTA  skills  on  plumbing  leaks.  19   Is  flow  rate  zero?   Check  if  the  machine  will  generate  any  output  of  fluid.  20   Repair  or  replace  cassette  or  peristaltic  actuators  if  necessary.   Some  feeding  pumps  use  a  cassette  or  pump  set  as  an  accessory  that  must  be  changed  and  refilled  periodically.  Sometimes  the  cassette  must  be  “primed”  or  “reset”  after  refilling.  Use  the  menu  options  on  the  machine  to  reset  the  cassette.  Peristaltic  pumps  use  rollers  that  are  controlled  and  moved  by  electromechanical  actuators.  Lubricate  or  replace  the  actuators  as  necessary.  21   Flow  ceases  when  pump  is  off?   When  the  flow  is  turned  off  by  unplugging  the  machine  or  with  user  controls,  verify  that  the  fluid  output  stops.  22   Verify  cassette  is  properly  attached  (if  applicable).   An  improperly  loaded  cassette  or  pump  set  might  leak  fluid  after  the  device  is  turned  off.  23   Correct  leaks  in  tubing.   See  BTA  skill  on  plumbing  leaks.  24   Repair  or  replace  free-­‐flow  valve  if  necessary.   Insure  the  free-­‐flow  valve  is  working  properly  and  clean  or  adjust  the  free  flow  valve  mechanically  as  necessary.  25   Does  occlusion  alarm  sound  when  output  tube  is  pinched?   When  the  output  tube  is  occluded,  the  machine  should  sound.    26   Is  machine  always  silent?   Investigate  if  machine  makes  noises  due  to  any  other  inputs  or  alarms.  27   Ensure  occlusion  sensor  cables  are  properly  connected  and  seated.   See  BTA  skills  on  electric  connections  and  connectors.  28   Replace/calibrate  occlusion  sensor.   See  BTA  skills  on  electric  connections  and  connectors.  Consider  replacing  sensor  if  it  cannot  be  repaired.  29   Replace  speaker.   Machine  is  not  in  silent  mode,  but  it  does  not  make  noise.  Replace  the  speaker.  30   Go  to  begin.   Restart  the  diagnostic  process  to  see  if  the  corrective  measures  have  repaired  the  machine.  




31   Go  to  begin.   Restart  the  diagnostic  process  to  see  if  the  corrective  measures  have  repaired  the  machine.  32   Feeding  pump  is  working  properly.   Return  the  machine  to  service  via  the  appropriate  clinical  personnel.  33   Check  if  machine  is  in  silent  mode.   Silent  mode  may  be  preventing  the  alarm.  Turn  off  silent  mode  and  check  alarm  again.    




Copyright 2016, Engineering World Health